WHO WE ARE

Who We Are

EMA is a firm of Structural & Forensic Engineers in Florida . Our structural Forensic engineers in Florida specializes in structural engineering,  design engineers, structural inspections,forensic Cause & Origin studies, structural engineering, forensic engineering, Roof hail damage inspections, roof wind damage inspections and hurricane damage assessment, floor tile damage claims and inspections, SB408 and sinkhole structural damage assessments, structural inspections & shop drawing review, Roof consulting, structural damage assessment, structural collapse inspections, infrared inspections, structural condition inspections , Roof Thermal imaging, electrical infrared inspections, Structural Engineering, Forensic engineering, building forensic inspections, building damage assessments etc. Structural & forensic Engineering disciplines within the firm are supervised by a Structural or Forensic engineers experienced in the area. Engineers performs, directs, and controls the document preparation in their areas of expertise. Who we are

EMA Forensic Associates also provide commercial clients with Phase I & II enviromental assessment for their related properties in compliance with ASTM 1527-05, 1527-13 and EPA vapor encrochment investigation using ASTM E-2600-10. Our fees are competitive.

WHAT WE DO

EMA Forensic Associates also provide commercial clients with Phase I & II enviromental assessment for their related properties in compliance with ASTM 1527-05, 1527-13 and EPA vapor encrochment investigation using ASTM E-2600-10. Our fees are competitive.

EMA maintains close contact with our clients in order to avoid unnecessary costly expenditures on a given project. In order to control project costs, all projects are value engineered at the direction of the building owner, building developer, architects or contractor. We provide quality and unbiased reports for roof damage claims, tile damage claims, building damage inspections and assessment, construction inspections, construction monitoring, Infrared Inspections, Electrical Infrared, Mechanical Infrared, Infrared Leaks, thermal imaging inspections, electrical thermal infrared locations using Infrared & thermal imaging, infrared scanning, infrared inspections in Florida, New York, Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana.

OUR TEAM

Construction Manager

Construction Management or Construction Project Management (CPM) is the overall planning, coordination, and control of a project from beginning to completion. CPM is aimed at meeting a client’s requirement in order to produce a functionally and financially viable project.

The functions of construction manager typically include the following:

  1. Specifying project objectives and plans including delineation of scope, budgeting, scheduling, setting performance requirements, and selecting project participants.
  2. Maximizing the resource efficiency through procurement of labor, materials and equipment.
  3. Implementing various operations through proper coordination and control of planning, design, estimating, contracting and construction in the entire process.
  4. Developing effective communications and mechanisms for resolving conflicts.

The Construction Management Association of America (a US construction management certification and advocacy body) says the 120 most common responsibilities of a Construction Manager fall into the following 7 categories: Project Management Planning, Cost Management, Time Management, Quality Management, Contract Administration, Safety Management, and CM Professional Practice. CM professional practice includes specific activities, such as defining the responsibilities and management structure of the project management team, organizing and leading by implementing project controls, defining roles and responsibilities, developing communication protocols, and identifying elements of project design and construction likely to give rise to disputes and claims.

Project Manager

They are organized, passionate and goal-oriented who understand what projects have in common, and their strategic role in how organizations succeed, learn and change.

Project managers are change agents: they make project goals their own and use their skills and expertise to inspire a sense of shared purpose within the project team. They enjoy the organized adrenaline of new challenges and the responsibility of driving business results.

They work well under pressure and are comfortable with change and complexity in dynamic environments. They can shift readily between the “big picture” and the small-but-crucial details, knowing when to concentrate on each.

Project managers cultivate the people skills needed to develop trust and communication among all of a project’s stakeholders: its sponsors, those who will make use of the project’s results, those who command the resources needed, and the project team members.

They have a broad and flexible toolkit of techniques, resolving complex, interdependent activities into tasks and sub-tasks that are documented, monitored and controlled. They adapt their approach to the context and constraints of each project, knowing that no “one size” can fit all the variety of projects. And they are always improving their own and their teams’ skills through lessons-learned reviews at project completion.

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Threshold Inspectors

The Threshold Inspector

The threshold inspector is a unique character. Unlike the building official, the threshold inspector is a private citizen. Unlike the owner, he does not wield the power of the purse. He is a certified, licensed, or registered engineer or architect whose sole focus is structural integrity. During construction, he inspects the structural components of all buildings meeting the following thresholds: 1) over three stories or 50 feet in height; or 2) an assembly occupancy exceeding 5,000 square feet and an occupant content greater than 500 persons. In other words, if the building is tall or holds a lot of people, the threshold inspector must inspect its structural elements during construction. Before a building official issues a certificate of occupancy, the threshold inspector must submit a signed and sealed statement that all structural, load-bearing components comply with the permitted construction documents. The intent was to increase the safety of structural components, the failure of which could spell disaster to persons and property. Good intentions.

In creating the threshold inspector, however, the Florida Legislature did an unusual thing: It cleaved the threshold inspector’s responsibility from his remuneration. This left murky the question of who, if anyone, controls and directs the threshold inspector.

In dissecting the tensions at work on the threshold inspector, let’s start with the known. The threshold inspector is statutorily “responsible” to the building official. On the other hand, the threshold inspector is selected and paid by the owner. This appears to contradict the common sense notion that with money, so goes control.


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